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20130101
20130131
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 7
KQEH (PBS) 3
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
WHUT
Jan 22, 2013 8:00am EST
day, when we honor the memory and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of nati
WETA
Jan 19, 2013 12:30am EST
memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
WETA
Jan 22, 2013 12:30am EST
monument to dr. martin luther king jr. you were with the president when the monument was unveiled. offer some reflections on what that experience was like. >> obviously, that was a tremendous experience last year. of my life, the last 10 years,eh wtehe tlehoig i tell the whole story about how we wanted to be a monument not just to king, but to the tremendous freedom struggle. to be there and watch president obama, i was interested in what he would have to say. age,, from a very early through his mother, understood king's importance and the importance of the movement. i am always very curious to see how he interprets king's legacy, how he draws inspiration from it. obviously, there are limits, as he showed when he gave his nobel peace prize speech. he specifically said that i cannot, as president, follow king and gandhi because i have to deal with the issue of terrorism. to me, that did not make very much sense. if i had a dialogue with the president, i would say, certainly martin luther king and gandhi understood terrorism. that was not a word or an idea that was invented in the last 10
WHUT
Jan 24, 2013 7:00pm EST
poorest neighborhoods. i get so angry on his birthday or on martin luther king day -- i heard politicians who turned their back totally on every single thing he lived and died for, never lifted a finger to bring an end to apartheid in schooling, which is now at a higher rate than it was the year he died, and they say, "i, too, had a dream." you cannot play games with the dreams of our prophets. dr. king did not say he had a dream that someday in the canyons of our cities, north and south, we will have tests and anxiety-ridden schools. that was not his dream. we've ripped apart his legacy, and then we use his name in vain. my thing, as you know, is children. children in their schools. i'm not an economist. i was scared of numbers, but my world is children. the only tried and proven avenue of exit for the children -- the poorest children in this country from the destitution of their parents is to give them an absolutely terrific, exciting, beautiful, spectacular, and expensive public education. [applause] and to fund it not simply at the same high level as the richest suburbs, b
WHUT
Jan 28, 2013 8:00am EST
the los, because we recognize first you have to have a suspicion of government. martin luther king was under surveillance. the government can violate your rights. we need that sensibility. governments can use their power to support corporate elites. they come together not just politically but economically. let me say this. martin luther king, jr., could be taken to jail without due process or judicial process because he had a connection with a freedom fighter who was called a terrorist named nelson mandela. he just got off the terrorist list in 2008. he had a relation to a terrorist, and under the present administration you can assassinate americans. you can take them to jail with out due process. we have got a black political prisoners right now in america, and they are in their becausee their love was such they are willing to tell the truth. that is a threat. we do not talk about them. that is what the culture of fear is not just silence. people are afraid. they are afraid to lose their jobs. you cannot have a culture of fear and generate a movement. justice will soon generate into s
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)